NORYANGJIN FISH MARKET

The fish market has long been on my list of things to do in Seoul. I’m a sucker for markets, and this is one of the most famous in Seoul. It is used by thousands of Koreans supplying their restaurants and homes with fresh food. There’s just one problem; I don’t like fish.

I don’t like eating fish and seafood in general, which is the main point of going to the market. I’ve tried many kinds of water creatures, but I just don’t like them. I like cheese. Jared thinks it’s mostly a texture issue. He gets frustrated when he wants seafood and I wrinkle my nose. However, I still claim that the raw fish dinner in Jeju counts for a lifetime.

We went to the market with friends who agreed to buy seafood with Jared and create a dinner. They agreed to cook me a steak. It was perfect; I was able to visit a famous site in Seoul and didn’t have to eat fish.

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The market is huge, but it has very orderly rows of vendors so it’s easy to find your way around. As expected, it smells like a fish market. There’s a briny scent of the ocean and the stench of fresh fish. There were all kinds of fish. Dead fish. Live fish. Dried fish. Fish on ice. Fish in buckets. Fish in tanks. There were varying sizes of prawns, octopi, eel, and shellfish. Apparently, you can buy your fish at the market and take it to one of the many restaurants there which will cook it for you immediately. Of course, it was more expensive if you bought a live creature than one that was one ice. If you visit, I highly suggest that you wear closed toe shoes. The ground is soaked with water, and most of the vendors wore rubber boots.

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We ended up buying two lobster and a bag of shrimp. I tried a bite of butter soaked lobster. It was ok, but it made my teeth sticky. Plus, there was steak right in front of me.

PADDLE PARTY
JULY: 31 in 31

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